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him before he receives miranda warning is the right thing to do. a short time ago, the aclu put out a statement saying every defendant is entitled to defend miranda lights. five lawmakers want him treated as an enemy combatant. 53 people remain in boston hospitals today, three in critical condition, including a 7-year-old girl. nbc news national investigative correspondent michaels i cough is in boston, ron allen outside boston's beth israel medical center where the suspect and many of the victims are being kept and kristen we willinger at the white house, let's get to the latest on investigation. for that, we turn to michaels i cough, again, in boston. what is the fbi focusing on today and moving forward? >> reporter: federal prosecutors are focusing on drafting a criminal complaint we could see as early as this afternoon, detailing the criminal charges against him supported by an affidavit from an fbi agent that would lay out some details of the plot. not all of them but could provide crucial new information for us about what tsarnaev actually did and raise and shed some light on
. >> let's talk about the issue a lot of people have been talking about. not everybody, but some. miranda rights. we've watched enough detective shows no know, police shows, they give miranda rights almost like blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. it's done. why do you think that's an issue? now we just got the word as we went on the air tonight the defendant here, the suspect, i guess he's a defendant now, has been given his miranda rights. >> this is truly something of an urban legend. people like to watch shows where a criminal goes free because he wasn't given miranda rights. that's extremely rare. i do criminal defense work. i can tell you, the most you can hope for in a miranda case is one or two statements will not make it into court. it's rare the whole case falls out unless everything -- >> so it's not the poison fruit thing? >> there is a poison fruit provision, standard. but it's very rare for it to pollute an entire case. >> let me ask you practically, why don't the law enforcement officials, the federal officials up there who have him in custody at the hospital, why didn't they just
, survived. he's an american citizen. natural i naturalized 9/11 of last year. should he be given miranda rights? should he be treated as an enemy combatant? that debate has started. give me the facts, first, what they'll do. >> this administration has made a policy decision here. first, that's number one. secondly, he cannot be tried as an enemy combatant in a military tribunal because that law was changed by the national defense authorization act of 2012 that says you can't do that to an american citizen. what some advocates, republicans, are saying such as lindsey graham are -- we understand, they say, we understand he's going to be tried in civilian court but start the questioning -- treat him as an enemy combatant under the law of war. question him by intelligence people. get all the intel you can. then turn him over to the civ civilian authorities. that's what they advocate. that's not going to happen, the administration has decided. he'll be questioned first by this special group set up in the last couple of years in terror cases called the high value detainee interrogation group,
time now we have a suspect who already was read his miranda rights. he already have a lawyer present. and i don't think that should affect any trained interrogator, any trained interviewer in doing their job. we have been doing this for many, many years. we did it against terrorist suspects, organized crimes, people who are charged with treason, spies, and it always worked, and it always gets the intended results. >> in terms of this breaking news that we've just got tonight. again, this is a senior government official saying that the initial interrogation of dzhokhar tsarnaev in his hospital bed, he says that he and his brother were not in touch with any overseas terrorists or groups. they conceived the attack on their own, motivated he told them by religious fervor. that's the language that i have been given. how -- how should that be approached in terms of strategically trying to unwind any threats that might exist beyond these young men? they're saying they acted alone. but presumably, the thing that made them want to do this could make other people want to do this as well. >> su
to decllay a readingf the miranda rights, the administration is not going along with republicans who are calling for a change in the prosecution play book. >> this man in my view should be designated as a potential enemy combatant and we should be allowed to question him for intelligence gathering purposes. >> literally hundreds of terrorists, those accused of terrorism, have been successfully prosecuted and imprisoned in the united states using the same process that's being used in this case in boston. >> at the same time, lawmakers want to know a lot more about the suspect's dead brother, tamerlan tsarnaev traveled to russia for six months last year after he was brought to the attention of the fbi as a possible islamist extremist. this has added a sharp new angle to the debate over immigration reform. >>> we have new video to share with you tonight. this is home video obtained by nbc news showing surviving bombing suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev competing in a wrestling match in 2009. he's the wrestler in the black uniform there. he competed in the 112-pound weight class in this massachu
this person without reading miranda rights because -- >> you're saying in foreign custody? >> even in u.s. custody there are situations now where a lot of people would say, you don't need to read miranda rights right away. this decision -- if a very strong suspect is picked up or somebody could provide significant information, i think that decision, whether or not to mirandize could be -- >> presumably as the fbi is going through this, they are looking to make sure there are no secondary attacks, first priority, right, imminent threat. >> absolutely. >> and second of all, to make sure they maintain the possibility of ultimately getting a criminal conviction? >> absolutely. >> joining us is an eyewitness to the bombing. he ran the marathon and was in the medical tent when the explosions happened. joining us by phone from boston. describe what you were doing in the medical tent at what time and what the scene there was like. >> yeah. the first thing, this was wave three, so i was running -- i was a charity runner, so we started at approximately 10:40 a.m. then i finished just under four,
yet to be charged in connection with the attack or been notified of his miranda rights, however, this morning officials tell nbc news he's awake and using pen and paper to answer questions from investigators. all of this as the fbi says it has obtained surveillance footage showing tsarnaev putting down his backpack near the finish line just minutes before the explosion. massachusetts governor deval patrick says he's been briefed on the footage. >> the suspect took the backpack off, put it down, did not react when the first explosion went off and then moved away from the backpack in time for the second explosion, so pretty clear about his involvement and pretty chilling, frankly. >> all right, so while we wait on that video, i want you to look at these new infrared images released showing the final intense moments of the manhunt. stun grenades just exploded as police moved in to capture the 19-year-old, and it capped a nearly four-day search for dzhokhar and his older brother, tamerlan, and while the nation was reeling, we are getting word this morning that the brothers actually
want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospitalized under sedation and remains unclear what kind of communication they are able to have him at the moment. judy is on the phone from north carolina, independent line. good morning, and welcome to the program. caller: thank you. my thought on the issue is that we are a large nation, an all- inclusive nation, and i believe that the boy scouts is a private organization and has the right to determine who their membership is. i believe there should be a third organization that some of the gay-rights people should put into place, and that would be the rainbow scouts. then they can put all the lbb tea in anything they wanted, -- lgbt. republi
that they don't have to read him his miranda rights right away. as time passes, does the justification for that exception grow weaker? are they on ls strong ground? >> it sure does, because as you know, miranda rights are a bedrock constitutional principle. we all have the right to remain silent, t get an attorney and be advised of those rights. the public safety exemption is a very narrow exemption. there has to be an imminent threat to the public. it certainly seems less imminent. >> don't officials who say the terror is over, don't they kind of undercut that argument, and does it really matter in the end? >> this is certainly an argument that's going to be handed to this defendant's defense attorney when that time comes. there have been contradictory statements made that there is no public threat, there is no ticking bomb, thank goodness, apparently, based on what we know so far. so we're giving them an argument to use later. >> the issue is, the questioning that's permitted without miranda is very narrow in scope, correct? >> yes. it's about what the public threat is. it's not all
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)